Mathblogging.org Weekly Picks

June 28, 2012 § Leave a comment

We try to read every blog post that goes through Mathblogging.org. For the Weekly Picks, we collect posts in one category from last week to give you an impression of what the mathematical blogosphere has to offer. (Read this for more information on this change.)

Last week, we focused on “General“, “Journalism“, and “Institutions.

Exposition

  • In memory of Alan Turing’s 100th birthday, many posts went up last week. This week’s range of topics pointed us to three in particular. At the LMS’s De Morgan Journal, Barry Cooper writes on the bullying of British geeks, Maurizio Codogno (translation) explains the Turing Google doodle and at Dueallamenouno (translation) Roberto Natalini portrays Turing and the much less known Turing-Murray theorem explaining animal fur markings.
  • The Renaissance Mathematicus portrays James Short. the greatest maker of 18th century reflecting telescopes.
  • Degree of Freedom explains why a cube cannot be dissected into pairwise different cubes.

Institutions

  • At SIAM connect, Shigui Ruan and Daozhou Gao explain their recent work on modeling malaria.

Journalism

Enjoy!

Mathblogging.org Weekly Picks

June 14, 2012 § Leave a comment

We try to read every blog post that goes through Mathblogging.org. For the Weekly Picks, we collect posts in one category from last week to give you an impression of what the mathematical blogosphere has to offer. (Read this for more information on this change.)

Last week, we focused on “Art“, “Visual” and “Fun.

Art, Visual

Exposition, Essay, etc.

  • At The Aperiodical, Alistair Bird explains where you should live.
  • At Kali & The Kaleidoscope, Fade Singh reflects on 8 months of an amateur (in the positive sense) attempt at attacking the Riemann Hypothesis.
  • At The Math Less Traveled, Brent invites you to prove a nice theorem about Fibonacci multiples.

Enjoy!

Mathblogging.org Weekly Picks

June 6, 2012 § Leave a comment

We try to read every blog post that goes through Mathblogging.org. For the Weekly Picks, we collect posts in one category from last week to give you an impression of what the mathematical blogosphere has to offer. (Read this for more information on this change.)

Last week, we focused on “Education.

Projects, lessons, etc.

Community

Art, Exposition etc.

Enjoy!

Mathblogging.org Weekly Picks

May 29, 2012 § Leave a comment

We try to read every blog post that goes through Mathblogging.org. For the Weekly Picks, we collect posts in one category from last week to give you an impression of what the mathematical blogosphere has to offer. (Read this for more information on this change.)

Last week, we focused on “Applied” blogs.

Reviews, Exposition, etc.

Community

  • The discussion following a guest post at Xi’an’s Og in defense of refereeing produced a proper preprint — it’s so good that it has already been rejected once!
  • Mathbabe wonders what data science PhDs are worth when they can’t access the data from private companies.
  • At Algorithms, game theory, social choice [...] etc, Haris Aziz gives a shout out to his co-author winning “best presentation by a young scientist” at the Matching Markets Conference.

Research

  • Regularize can stop being bothered by three problems in complexity — RIP & NSP are NP-hard and homotopy for l1 has exponential growth.
  • Nathaniel Johnston shares some notes on norms and dual norms in finite dimensional Hilbert spaces.

Enjoy!

Mathblogging.org Weekly Picks

May 22, 2012 § Leave a comment

We try to read every blog post that goes through Mathblogging.org. For the Weekly Picks, we collect posts in one category from last week to give you an impression of what the mathematical blogosphere has to offer. (Read this for more information on this change.)

Last week, we focused on “General“, “Journalism“, and “Institutions.

Exposition

  • At M-Phi, Catarina Dutilh Novaes discusses a Kantian relic — “logic as umpire”.
  • Math Munch has a great week with fractals, kitting and 3-d design.

Institutions

Journalism

  • Mariano Tomatis investigates the fatal number 27.
  • At Simple City, Richard Elwes ponders the statistics for ranking Cricket players.
  • At NewScientist, Jacob Aron reports on a recent paper on a space-filling problem real-world applications.

Enjoy!

Mathblogging.org Weekly Picks

May 15, 2012 § Leave a comment

We try to read every blog post that goes through Mathblogging.org. For the Weekly Picks, we collect posts in one category from last week to give you an impression of what the mathematical blogosphere has to offer. (Read this for more information on this change.)

Last week, we focused on “Pure Researchers.

Research

  • At Aleph Zero Categorical, Jason Polak gives Kaplansky’s proof that every projective module over a local ring is free.
  • At My Biased Coin, guest blogger Justin Thaler explains a recent paper he co-authored on attribute-efficient learning.
  • At Combinatorics and more, Gil Kalai lets you catch up before the debate on Quantum Fault-Tolerance Debate continues.

Community

  • At The Accidental Mathematician, Izabella Laba continues her series on teaching loads.
  • At Computational Complexity, Lance Fortnow observes how CS conference have becom a pay-to-publish venue.
  • At Piece of Mind, Nassif Ghoussoub shares more bad news on the bleed-out of NSERC’s Discovery Program.
  • At Mathlog, Thilo Kuessner links to three videos by the Humboldt Foundation portraying Weiss, Kreimer and Levine.

Exposition

  • At Area 777, Conan Wu shares some notes on a talk by Terry Tao on the 3-dim Hilbert-Smith conjecture.
  • Gaussianos (translation) explains how Fermat’s Last Theorem escaped the clutches of Lame.
  • Out of the Norm introduces you to the wonderful Schreier sets with a surprise connection to Fibonacci numbers.

Enjoy!

Mathblogging.org Weekly Picks

May 9, 2012 § Leave a comment

We try to read every blog post that goes through Mathblogging.org. For the Weekly Picks, we collect posts in one or more categories from last week to give you an impression of what the mathematical blogosphere has to offer. (Read this for more information on this change.)

Last week, we focused on “Art“, “Visual” and “Fun.

Popular mathematics

  • At The Aperiodical, Katie Steckles and Christian Perfect grow their own delicious self-reproducing foods.
  • On youtube, Art of the Problem explains perfect secrecy and pseudo-randomness.

Visualizations

  • The Math Kid illustrates the Euler spiral with an orange.

Art

Enjoy!

Where Am I?

You are currently browsing the weekly picks category at Mathblogging.org -- the Blog.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 147 other followers